What’s Good For You Can Hurt

Look, I post about the negative effects of Diabetes a LOT! It’s rather hard not to; Diabetes is one of the conditions with the highest number of side effects to the body that’s currently out there. And not just to the body… Studies have linked Alzheimer’s disease to a from of Diabetes.

Needless to say, if and when the day comes that there is a positive side to Diabetes, I’ll post about it. For example, if a side effect of Type 1 Diabetes ever causes me to gain sculpted abs, I’ll post about that like a mother-f&*ker.

If you’re like me, you tend to test your blood glucose at least six to ten times a day. If you still rely on a finger prick in order to test your blood sugar, this can cause some rarely considered complications. Especially to your fingertips!

According to the Mayo Clinic, here are the steps one should follow each and every time you test your blood:

  1. Wash and dry your hands well (Do this each and every time you test);
  2. Insert a test strip into your meter;
  3. Prick the side of your fingertip with the needle (lancet) provided with your test strip (Try to avoid pricking the fingertip; this is where all the sensory nerves for touch are located and it can hurt like hell);
  4. Gently squeeze or massage your finger until a drop of blood forms;
  5. Touch and hold the edge of the test strip to the drop of blood;
  6. The meter will display your blood glucose level on a screen after a a few seconds.

There are some meters that will allow you to take blood from alternate sites such as your forearm or your palm, but these tend to be a bit less accurate. (https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/diabetes/in-depth/blood-sugar/art-20046628)

Repeated finger pricks throughout the day can become very painful, regardless of where you test. Another problem is contamination. Obviously, jamming a piece of steel into your finger includes the risk of allowing access to a certain level of bacteria and germs. As with any injury when you have Diabetes, this can cause a risk of infection and other issues.

Using alcohol swabs to ensure a clean site is no longer a viable option, as residual alcohol on your finger can affect the blood sugar reading. If you insist on using them, you need t ensure that residual alcohol has been dried or removed prior to testing. This is why it’s necessary to wash with warm water and soap prior to each test.

Even with Continuous Glucose Monitoring, testing your blood with finger pricks is still necessary for accuracy and to calibrate your CGM. So there’s no getting away from it. But making sure you keep your sites clean and your testing accurate through calibrations and diagnostics will ensure you avoid unnecessary complications. ☯

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Shawn

I am a practitioner of the martial arts and student of the Buddhist faith. I have been a Type 1 Diabetic since I was 4 years old and have been fighting the uphill battle it includes ever since. I enjoy fitness and health and looking for new ways to improve both, as well as examining the many questions of life. Although I have no formal medical training, I have amassed a wealth of knowledge regarding health, Diabetes, martial arts as well as Buddhism and philosophy. My goal is to share this information with the world, and perhaps provide some sarcastic humour along the way. Welcome!

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